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A Fool's Errand
Abraham Lincoln
The Civil War And The Constitution 1859-1865, Vols. 1 and 2
The Constitution of the United States and Other Historical American Documents
The Contest in America
History of the Civil War 1861-1865
The Memoirs of General P. H. Sheridan
Personal Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant
Recollections and Letters of Robert E. Lee
Starr King in California
Vanished Arizona: Recollections of My Army Life
Abraham Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln
By Lord Charnwood
$36.99 hardcover; $12.99 paperback


One of the most important works on Abraham Lincoln from the era when he was passing out of living memory and into history, this 1917 classic is a rich, evocative portrait of the man and how actions as a leader were shaped by his character and ideals. From its British perspective, offering a fresh angle on an American legend, to its charming readability, Charnwood's treatise-which was called, in 1947, "the best one-volume life of Lincoln ever written" by historian Benjamin Thomas-today remains one of the most intriguing examinations of the great president, and a keystone for understanding the evolution of Lincoln scholarship.
LORD CHARNWOOD (1864-1945), born as Godfrey Rathbone Benson, was a British author and academic. He also wrote the biography "Theodore Roosevelt."


Abraham Lincoln
By Robert G. Ingersoll
$14.95 paperback


Ingersoll published this lecture in 1894, a stirring tribute to the honesty, courage, and genius of a beloved leader at a time when his life and works were still within living memory. Focusing in particular on Lincoln's abhorrence of slavery and his work to defeat it as a national institution, Ingersoll offers readers today an invaluable perspective on the great President from the era immediately after his own, when his legend was being cemented in the American imagination.
ROBERT GREEN INGERSOLL (1833-1899) was a notorious radical, as outspoken in his day as Richard Dawkins or Christopher Hitchens are today. His uncompromising views on religion and slavery (they were bad, in his opinion), women's suffrage (a good idea, he believed), and other matters of his era made him a wildly popular orator and critic of American culture and public life. Legendary as a speaker—he memorized his speeches and could talk for hours without notes—and as a proponent of free thought, Ingersoll is an American original whose words still ring with truth and power.


Abraham Lincoln: A History, Vols. 1-10
By John M. Hay and John G. Nicolay
$44.99 hardcover; $27.99 paperback
***Save up to $100 off the retail price by ordering the entire series in hardcover for $349. The series is also available in paperback for $60 below the retail price, at $219. Cosimo offers free shipping on this item, but only for a limited time.

Considered one of the best treatments of the presidency of Abraham Lincoln of its time, this portrait of the man and his administration of the United States at the moment of its greatest upheaval is both intimate and scholarly. Written by two private secretaries to the president and first published in 1890, this astonishingly in-depth work is still praised today for its clear, easy-to-read style and vitality. This new replica edition features all the original illustrations.
» VOLUME ONE: the Lincoln lineage from the late 18th century • Lincoln's boyhood • his experience in the legislature and his early law practice • Lincoln's early opposition to slavery • the campaign for Congress "civil war" in Kansas.
» VOLUME TWO: the conventions of 1856 • "Congressional ruffianism" • Dred Scott • the Lincoln-Douglas debates
• Lincoln's Ohio speeches • the Cooper Institute speech • the presidential election • beginnings of rebellion • the "Forty Muskets."
» VOLUME THREE: South Carolina's secession • Fort Sumter • Anderson's truce • the cotton "republics" • Lincoln's "secret night journey" • the inauguration • Lincoln's Cabinet.
» VOLUME FOUR: Fort Pickens reinforced • the fall of Sumter • the national uprising • Washington in danger • rebellious Maryland • European neutrality • McClellan and Grant • Bull Run the Army of the Potomac.
» VOLUME FIVE: "the Trent affair" • Grant and Thomas in Kentucky • Lincoln's plans of campaign • Manassas evacuated • the "Monitor" and "Merrimac" • Farragut's victory • the Shiloh campaign • Yorktown.
» VOLUME SIX: diplomacy of 1862 • Battle of Antietam • Emancipation • the removal of McClellan • Fredericksburg • Seward and Chase • Perryville and Murfreesboro • Lincoln and the churches • Negro soldiers.
» VOLUME SEVEN: the enrollment and the draft • the Lincoln-Seymour correspondence • Chancellorsville • the campaign of the bayous • the invasion of Pennsylvania • Gettysburg • Vicksburg • the defeat of the Peace Party at the polls • prisoners of war.
» VOLUME EIGHT: conspiracies in the North • habeas corpus • Chickamauga • Chattanooga • Burnside in Tennessee • the Gettysburg Address • foreign relations in 1863 • Grant general-in-chief • Spotsylvania.
» VOLUME NINE:
Sherman's campaign to the Chattahoochee • the Cleveland convention • the Wade-Davis manifesto • the last days of the rebel navy • Horace Greeley's peace mission • Atlanta • Sheridan in the Shenandoah • Cedar Creek • Lincoln reelected.
» VOLUME TEN: Franklin and Nashville • the Thirteenth Amendment • the Hampton Roads conference • the second inaugural • surrender at Appomattox • the fall of the rebel capital • the capture of Jefferson Davis • the assassination.

JOHN MILTON HAY (1838–1905) American journalist and statesman, was only 22 when he became a private secretary to Lincoln. A former member of the Providence literary circle when he attended Brown University in the late 1850s, he may have been the real author of Lincoln’s famous “Letter to Mrs. Bixby.” After Lincoln’s death, Hay later served as editor of the
New York Tribune and as U.S. ambassador to the United Kingdom under President William McKinley.
JOHN GEORGE NICOLAY (1832–1901)
was born in Germany and emigrated to the U.S. as a child. Before serving as Lincoln’s private secretary, he worked as a newspaper editor and later as assistant to the secretary of state of Illinois. He also wrote "Campaigns of the Civil War" (1881).



Abraham Lincoln: The Gettysburg Speech and Other Papers
By Carl Schurz
$16.95 paperback


Here, in one compact volume, is an extraordinary tribute to the life and legacy of one of the greatest presidents in United States history. Abraham Linconln's own words stand as powerful testimony to his wisdom and leadership: here you'll find his famous Gettysburg Address, both inaugural addresses, the Emancipation Proclamation, a selection of correspondence, his last public speech, and other notable papers. Written by those who knew him, loved him, and witnessed his dramatic impact on United States during its most perilous crisis, this collection offers us the invaluable perspective of his contemporaries and the beginnings of the towering image we have of Abraham Lincoln today.
CARL SCHURZ (1829-1906) was a prominent and trusted member of the Lincoln administration.


Herndon's Lincoln: A True Story of a Great Life
By William H. Herndon and Jesse W. Weik
$38.99 hardcover; $29.99 paperback


Written only 25 years after his death at the hands of an assassin
, this beloved biography of Abraham Lincoln offers something that most other studies of him do not: an intimate portrait constructed from the memories, experiences, and evidence of those who knew him. Lincoln's former law partner William Henry Herndon broke new journalistic ground when he insisted, in compiling this charming and insightful work, on gathering input from others who knew Lincoln well. Everything from old correspondence to new interviews Herndon conducted himself with such figures as Mary Todd Lincoln contribute to a personal look at the great man as a man, not as a myth. First published in 1889 across three small volumes, this replica edition collects the complete work into one book that will surprise and delight even those students of history who believe they know everything there is to know about Lincoln.
WILLIAM HENRY HERNDON (1818-1891), Lincoln's former law partner, broke new journalistic ground when he insisted, in compiling this charming and insightful work, on gathering input from others who knew Lincoln well. Everything from old correspondence to new interviews Herndon conducted himself with such figures as Mary Todd Lincoln contribute to a personal look at the great man as a man, not as a myth. First published in 1889 across three small volumes, this replica edition collects the complete work into one book that will surprise and delight even those students of history who believe they know everything there is to know about Lincoln.
JESSE W. WEIK (1857-1930) was an American author best known for his work on "Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life," the first authoritative biography of Abraham Lincoln.


The Life of Abraham Lincoln: Vols. I & II
By Ida M. Tarbell
$19.95 paperback


She is remembered today as a muckraking journalist, author of such blockbuster exposes as 1904's "The History of the Standard Oil Company," which contributed to the corporation's breakup in 1911. But in this 1900 work, as charming as it is important, American author Ida Minerva Tarbell shows a softer side as she traces, with a laudatory and admiring spirit, the development of the character and morals of Abraham Lincoln. Begun as a project by McClure's Magazine to collect and preserve the reminiscences of Lincoln's friends and acquaintances while they were still alive, the project grew into a series of articles for the periodical, and then finally this two-volume spiritual biography of the great man, which draws on firsthand memories and other material, including original sources such speeches, letters, and telegrams. Volume I covers Lincoln's life from before he was even born, with the origins of the Lincoln family back to the early 17th century, through his education, his service in the Black Hawk War, his early dabblings in politics, his experiences and attitudes as a lawyer, and the presidential campaign of 1860.
IDA MINERVA TARBELL (1857–1944) is remembered today as a muckraking journalist, thanks to her blockbuster 1904 exposé on Standard Oil. Originally published as a series of articles in McClure’s magazine, the groundbreaking work highlighted the dangers of business monopolies and triggered the breakup of the company.